Tag Archives: Inktober 2019

No Use Crying – #Inktober2019 Day 17

No use crying over spilt ink.  No need to – the black ink bottle that I knocked over spilt onto my glass palette, so I’ll still be able to use it.

I’m on Day 17 on the 23rd – no point in crying about that either!

What do you see in the ink?

🙂

Helen

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No Use Crying – #Inktober2019 Day 17

Buy Nothing – #Inktober2019 Day 16

We’re fortunate to have a local Buy Nothing group and as members we can pass on items we no longer need to those that do, or gift services and also ask for help or something we do need.  The group is part of a global movement promoting acts of kindness, promoting Reducing, Reusing and Recycling and gratitude.  Find out more here.

On Day 16 I was able to gift an elbow support which turned out not to be suitable for me or my husband.  I wish I’d had more to give as there were several people needing such a support, but am happy to have helped one.

🙂

Helen

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Painting Green- #Inktober2019 Day 15

I try to minimise the impact of my painting on our environment.

While I’m painting I wipe  the acrylic paint off my brush on a rag or a paper / card offcut, before I rinse my brush in water.

The dirty paint water goes into a bucket under my easel. There it stands until the bucket is nearly full, by which time much of the remaining paint has settled into a skin at the bottom.  The bucket is emptied onto our gravel drive to help keep down weeds- and the skin into the general waste bin.

I test the colour of paint on a piece of scrap watercolour paper before I apply the paint to canvas.  I often end up with a very colourful and useful ‘scrap’.

When I’ve finished a painting, I apply any paint left on my palette to small canvases or pieces of multi-media paper. These loose creations may be transformed into a work of art – one day.

I recently tried painting on fabric for the first time – and realised that I actually add paint to fabric often – whilst cleaning my brushes! So I ironed a paint rag, brushed fabric fixative on it, heat set it, backed it and started a piece of textile art by stitching on it.  Going green is fun!

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Painting Green – #Inktober2019 Day 15

I can go greener…

Golden Paints describe a better way to dispose of acrylic paint water here.  I’m keen to give it a go.

I’ve ordered a starter set of non-toxic acrylic paints from Hydrocryl in Victoria, Australia (they ship world wide) – more fun is on its way!

🙂

Helen

 

I’m Done With Picasso – #Inktober2019 Day 14

I finished my Picasso inspired acrylic painting on Day 14.  Imagine the green inks as vivid and muted shades of oranges, yellows and reds – and the black inks as various blues!

Abstracting my Blue Stars design with the use of brush strokes, shapes and colours was harder than I had imagined. I now have a deeper appreciation of Picasso’s art and other abstract works!

🙂

Helen

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Done With Picasso -#Inktober2019 Day 14

The Great Escape – #Inktober2019 Day 13

Breakfast preparations were put on hold on day 13, when my husband called “The chooks are out!”

Our entire flock had decided to take the opportunity to escape from their large run, where they are safe from cats and foxes, to head towards our veggie garden!

We had a very late breakfast!

Our chickens biorecycle our kitchen scraps,weeds and grasses, produce manure for composting, provide a better alternative to the excessive environmental impact of factory farming and provide more nutritious eggs for us, family and friends.  Gotta be happy with that!

🙂

Helen

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The Great Escape – #Inktober2019 Day 13

 

A Green Blue Wren – #Inktober2019 Day 12

On day 12 my husband and I enjoyed visiting the Open Studio of Sally Edmonds in Kalamunda, Western Australia.  Sally shares her love of birds by creating detailed images , using coloured pencils, pastels or acrylic paint.

Blue Wrens are a popular subject for the artist and her followers.

Interestingly it seems that Superb Fairy Wrens are equipped to combat climate change, as a 10 year-long study shows the native bird can strategically alter the size of its laid eggs to help its chicks survive in harsher conditions.

🙂

Helen

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A Green Blue Wren – #Inktober2019 Day 12