Tag Archives: Australia

A Bunch Of Love – #Inktober2019 Day 10

On day 10 our Wedding Bushes were in full bloom, as they always are on our wedding anniversary.

Ricinocarpos tuberculatus, more readily remembered as ‘Wedding Bush’, is endemic to Australia. The bushes have thick, dark green, beautiful foliage and are covered in masses of white flowers in spring and early summer.

To celebrate them and our special day, I picked a bunch of love for our garden.

🙂
Helen

I19010 (2)

A Bunch Of Love – #Inktober2019 Day 10

Inktober 2019 Day 1 – Channelling Andy Warhol

This will be my fifth year of joining in Inktober! This year my self imposed constraints are:

  • Green ink in addition to black
  • An association with the environment
  • Relating to my day.

On day 1 I worked on a painting of beautiful Blue Stars (Chamaescilla corymbosa) which are native to Western Australia. I’m working to simulate the style of Andy Warhol’s iconic Marilyn Munroe artwork.  So I decided to do likewise in ink for Inktober.

I19001 (2) copy

#Inktober 2019 Day 1 – Blue Stars Aka Andy Warhol

Inktober is a great incentive to play and try new things.  It also helps one to get used to publishing the less than perfect!

I didn’t manage to obtain an even flat green so edited the scan to get a more Warhol effect.  Is digital ink cheating?…

🙂

Helen

 

Don an Apron!

Sam Kekovich did more for the Australian lamb industry than anyone else I can think of.  Certainly more than my lamb recipe illustrations.  Sam’s ‘tongue in cheek’ diatribes were enjoyed by millions over a number of years.  Link to the 2006 ad here and you’ll understand my choice of title for this post!

Maybe a few will enjoy my sketches.

Balsamic & Rosemary Lamb Cutlets

Balsamic & Rosemary Lamb Cutlets

Balsamic Lamb Backstraps

Balsamic Lamb Backstraps

Lamb Burgers

Lamb Burgers

Lamb Koftas

Lamb Koftas

Spicy Lamb Cutlets

Spicy Lamb Cutlets

Hooroo,
🙂
Helen

 

A Snowflake Is Winter’s Butterfly

The only snowflakes we get to see here in the Perth Hills of Western Australia are the botanical kind but we do get to see them in Winter.  Our Snowflakes are native to Europe where they bloom in Summer – it’s a fun world!

Leucojum

Snowflakes – Helen Lock

This is the third pen and watercolour painting in my series on Western Australian weeds.  These beautiful Snowflakes (Leucojum Aestivum) were blooming a couple of months ago when I captured them on paper.  I just love the finger like tepals sporting green nail varnish.

Leucojum is a genus of bulbous plants native to Europe.  They grow here up to 60 cm tall in winter wet habitats.  They are a priority species for control in conservation areas.  So, another plant for us to contain but not only for the sake of indigenous plants but also for the safety of our children and animals as all parts are poisonous, especially the bulbs.

Poison is in everything, and no thing is without poison. The dosage makes it either a poison or a remedy.                                                                 – Paracelsus

How true!
🙂
Helen

One Mans Flowers…

Many of the wildflowers in our garden at Balligar in Western Australia have turned out to be weeds – officially declared pests! This has led to much thought about the concept of weeds – or “matter out of place” as described by E.J. Salisbury (a botanist) – and germinated the seeds of a new series. This is a prototype inspired by the Arum Lilies that grow in clumps in the lower part of our property.

Arum Lilies - WA Weed

One Mans Flowers… By Helen Lock

Done using permanent ink and watercolour pencils on Arches Watercolour paper. Border and text added using Publisher.

All comments, critiques, recommendations and suggestions welcome!

🙂
Helen

Geewillinkinwinkings – It’s Monday Already – and February 2014!#$@!

Time is an illusion

said Albert Einstein.  This gives me comfort as I wonder how come January has been and gone already!  Gone before I started my New Year Resolutions, gone before I finished even one painting, gone!

At least I did start a painting.  When going for a walk a tree will sometimes catch my attention and stop me in my tracks as it makes me aware of its individuality, its own brand of beauty and its character.  There is one such tree in the reserve behind our home.  It’s a  Jarrah tree that bears the scars of a long life with a belly that suggests a full and indulgent one.  I fancy that it’s raising a glass and saying ‘Cheers!’ as I walk by and have nicknamed it ‘The Beer Belly Tree’.

The Beer Belly Tree

The Beer Belly Tree

The painting (1m by .75m) will be one of a series so I’m painting it out of context but realistically (in acrylics) so that those that have seen the tree may recognize it – I have no idea why I want to do so!

This is the progress by the end of January:

The Beer Belly In Progress

The Beer Belly In Progress

I’ve many reasons and excuses for not getting further – one is the level of detail messes with my brain!

Beer Belly Detail

Beer Belly Detail

Some other reasons for lack of progress: the extreme heat during January; a dysfunctional air-conditioner in the studio and the catastrophic bush fire on Sunday January 12th – a day that topped 46 degrees Celsius in the Perth Hills.  The fire devastated 650 hectares and destroyed over 50 homes, two in the west of our suburb, most in the suburb to our West.  It’s heart rendering to see the damage and feel the pain of the bush – fauna and flora – and the people directly affected.  We had to evacuate but were spared the trauma of losing our home where so many memories are stored.  We’ve learned from the experience and will be better prepared if there’s a next time.

As for the bush, it has seen fire before and has also learned from the experience.  Successful flora have adapted to survive and regenerate after fire. I think the Beer Belly Tree is a survivor of a past fire as its base is as black as charcoal in parts.

Despite the awfulness of the inferno on January 12 and its aftermath, I was struck by the beautiful colours and shapes of the blackened tree trunks and the crispy, burnt orange leaves as I drove by a stretch of incinerated bush the other day – and smiled to see the blackened stumps of grass trees already pushing up young, green spiky leaves.

As artist Joseph Beuys said:

I think the tree is an element of regeneration which in itself is a concept of time.

Time for me to go.
🙂
Helen

Run Postie, Run Run Run!

Christmas is almost upon us so it seems appropriate to give some thought to the postmen that are running hard to deliver the billions of cards and gifts across the planet that represent so much love and care between people.

When communication by email first became popular there was a concern for the future employment of our ‘posties’.   Now the popularity of online buying means that Australia Post has coped with the delivery of 20 million items every day this year – to a 11 million addresses.   These statistics don’t include the mail handled by all of the private courier companies!  The population of Australia is only 22.7 million – approximately.

These ‘postmen’ were running in our garden as early as Spring:

Kennedia Prostrata

Running Postman at Balligar

Also known as Kennedia Prostrata, they run along the ground forming a tangled mat.  This rendering of them in pen and watercolour is the last in the series of 12 wildflowers found in our garden this year that I painted in a style reminiscent of stained glass designs.  I’m looking forward to creating more paintings in various styles in 2014.

Meanwhile I hope the festive season brings love and care to all and a happy, peaceful New Year.  It’s nearly here – run postie, run!

🙂
Helen