Tag Archives: Gazania

Reversing Time – Day 26 Inktober 2017

If you go back in time you’ll find that Gazanias, common in Australia today, originated from South Africa. Now they are regarded as noxious weeds in some states – a case of wrong time, wrong place.

I go back in time whenever I do the housework – I have a strong sense of deja vu (or Groundhog Day?) and many items take me back as I clean them, so I get to enjoy again precious moments with loved ones.

Reversing Time – Day 26 #Inktober #Inktober2017

I work hard to find happiness in repetitive chores!

:))
Helen

Too Much Of A Good Thing…

“Too much of a good thing can be wonderful” said Mae West

but whilst a host of golden Gazanias is a wonderful sight, too many of these natives of South Africa here in Western Australia take up space that our own natives might otherwise occupy.  There may also be a flow on effect to native fauna that depend on native flora.

So like many other things in life (too many?), moderation is the key.  Here is the second in my new series on the weeds that grow in our garden.

Gazanias Laugh At Drought

Too Much Of A Good Thing – Helen Lock

I have painted Gazanias before and posted more about them here.

Having enjoyed over 50mm / 2 inches of rain in the first 24 hours of this week, here in the Perth Hills, we’re laughing at drought too.  Long may it last!

🙂
Helen

Gazanias Laugh At Drought!

Gazanias are popular in Australia because they do well in dry, poor soils and provide brightly coloured flowers over a long period.

Gazania At Balligar

Gazania At Balligar

We have an assortment of Gazanias growing themselves at Balligar.  The brilliant colours and form of an unfurling bloom prompted me to make this coloured pencil rendering:

Gazania Orange by Helen Lock

Gazania Orange by Helen Lock

Every Silver Lining…

Unfortunately the success of the Gazanias, which are native to South Africa, hinders regeneration of native flora and may have a flow on impact to native fauna. They can certainly add to the rabbit problem as rabbits are rather partial to eating them.

This means I’m in for some serious weeding to keep them under control now Autumn is here.  I know I’ll be rewarded in spring with a show of native wildflowers too.

Hooroo!
🙂
Helen